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RESEARCH:

The 4Rs of Aquatic Rescue: educating the public about safety and risks of bystander rescue

UNIVERSITY OR ORGANISATION: University of Auckland, WaterSafe Auckland

SUBJECT: Bystander Rescue
TYPE: Survey
DATE: 2016


From 1980 to 2014, 87 persons drowned in New Zealand while attempting to rescue others; all incidents occurred in open water and most (80%) fatalities were male. While bystander rescue has been promoted as a way of preventing drowning, little is known about the knowledge base that informs potential rescuers. This study utilized a family water safety programme to promote a resource entitled the 4Rs of Aquatic Rescue. Upon completion of the programme, significant differences were evident in respondents’ understanding of rescue safety, but this did not translate to greater confidence or disposition towards performing a rescue. Ways of promoting bystander safety around water are discussed and recommendations for future studies are made.

 

COUNTRY

New Zealand

AUTHORS

Kevin Moran

Jonathon Webber

Teresa Stanley

JOURNAL / PUBLICATION

International Journal of Injury Control and Safety Promotion

RESPONDENTS

174 respondents

Auckland 467 parents / caregivers

790 children aged 9 months - 8 years

ACTIVITY

Rescue

Lifejacket use

ENVIRONMENT

Public swimming pools

AGE

Adults 9 months - 8 years

Children

GENDER

Male

Female

ETHNICITY

NZ European / Pakeha

Maori

Pacific Peoples

Asian

Other

 

 
 

 

 

 

We are leading the development of customised insights that help explain New Zealand’s drowning problem, and shape interventions for safe play across our waterways.
For information contact the Head of Data, Research and Insights on wsnz@watersafety.org.nz

 
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