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RESEARCH:

Self-Estimates of Swimming and Rescue Competence, and the Perceptions of the Risk of Drowning among Minority Groups in New Zealand – Life Saving or Life Threatening?

UNIVERSITY OR ORGANISATION: American Research Institute for Policy Development

 

SUBJECT: Aquatic Education, Competence and Swimming
TYPE: Cross sectional study with written survey
DATE: 2018


Analysis of drowning and rescue statistics suggests that some population groups (such as males, youth, and minority groups) are at greater risk than others. This study reports on the perceived water competency of minority groups, and its potential to mitigate the risk of drowning when swimming in open water. Most participants reported undesirable attitudes which could account for the over-representation of these minority groups in drowning statistics. Significant gender differences were evident for all risk perceptions. This study suggests that males from disadvantaged lower SES minority groups may be at greater risk of drowning because of their lack of competency and their tendency to overestimate this, with regard to swimming and rescue competence in open water environments.

 

COUNTRY

New Zealand

AUTHORS

Teresa Stanley

Kevin Moran

JOURNAL / PUBLICATION

JSTOR

RESPONDENTS

194 Maori and Pasifika adults

12 manufacturing organisations in South Auckland

194 employees

ACTIVITY

Swimming

ENVIRONMENT

Open water

AGE

20-64 years

GENDER

Male
Female

ETHNICITY

Maori

Pasifika

 

 
 

 

 

 

We are leading the development of customised insights that help explain New Zealand’s drowning problem, and shape interventions for safe play across our waterways.
For information contact the Head of Data, Research and Insights on wsnz@watersafety.org.nz

 
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