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RESEARCH:

Parental Perceptions of Water Competence and Drowning Risk for Themselves and Their Children in an Open Water Environment

UNIVERSITY OR ORGANISATION: WaterSafe Auckland, The University of Auckland

 

SUBJECT: Aquatic Education, Competence and Swimming
TYPE: Cross sectional survey
DATE: 2017


Little is known about people’s perceptions of how much swimming competency is required to provide protection from drowning, especially in open water environments where most drowning incidents occur. This study reports on parental perceptions of swimming competency of themselves and their children and parents’ beliefs on their safety when swimming in open water. Most parents We discuss the implications of holding an overly-optimistic belief in the protective value of minimal levels of swimming competency for open water safety. Further exploration is recommended regarding the differences between real and perceived swimming competency especially among at-risk groups such as male children and adults.

 

COUNTRY

New Zealand

AUTHORS

Teresa Stanley

Kevin Moran

JOURNAL / PUBLICATION

International Journal of Aquatic Research and Education

RESPONDENTS

Principals of 5 primary schools

Auckland region

309 parents / caregivers of primary school-aged children

ACTIVITY

Swimming

ENVIRONMENT

Open water

AGE

5-11

Primary school age

GENDER

Male
Female

ETHNICITY

NZ European / Pakeha

Maori

Pasifika

Asian

 

 
 

 

 

 

We are leading the development of customised insights that help explain New Zealand’s drowning problem, and shape interventions for safe play across our waterways.
For information contact the Head of Data, Research and Insights on wsnz@watersafety.org.nz

 
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