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RESEARCH:

Association of water temperature and submersion duration and drowning outcome

UNIVERSITY OR ORGANISATION: University of Washington

SUBJECT: Cold Water
TYPE: Clinical Paper
DATE: 2014


Drowning injury is a hypoxic injury. Its outcome is determined by many factors involving the victim, the environment, and the incident. Among the possible environmental factors associated with drowning, cold water has been considered an important determinant of outcome because of its potential to induce the diving reflex and hypothermia. Both these conditions may be protective by decreasing metabolic demand and thus, the deleterious effects of hypoxia in a drowning victim. A case control study was performed to assess the association between age, reported submersion duration, and estimated water temperature and drowning outcomes.

 

COUNTRY

United States

AUTHORS

Linda Quana

Christopher D. Mack

Melissa A. Schiff

JOURNAL / PUBLICATION

N/A

RESPONDENTS

Subjects were those who drowned in open water (lakes, rivers, and ocean)

Washington State - 3 counties 1975 - 1996

Total 1094 open water drowning victims

ACTIVITY

Rescue

ENVIRONMENT

Lakes

Rivers

Ocean

AGE

All Ages

GENDER

Male

Female

ETHNICITY

White

Non-white

 

 
 

 

 

 

We are leading the development of customised insights that help explain New Zealand’s drowning problem, and shape interventions for safe play across our waterways.
For information contact the Head of Data, Research and Insights on wsnz@watersafety.org.nz

 
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